Interviews with OUSD Leaders

 

In the videos below, staff discuss a range of strategies designed to improve outcomes for black male students, particularly in the area of disproportionate suspensions.

 

Social and Emotional Learning as a Key to Behavioral Health and Fewer Suspensions

Barb McClung, Coordinator of Behavioral Health for the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD), discusses how OUSD uses social and emotional learning to encourage the kind of conduct that avoids the need for suspensions and creates a culture of shared behavioral expectations at school sites.

 

Using Data to Define and Eliminate Adverse Outcomes for Black Males

Jean Wing, Director of Research Assessment and Data for the Oakland Unified School District, discusses the role data plays in illuminating the challenges facing black male students, the source of their problems and strategies to eliminate the inequity.

 

Taking a Holistic Approach to Improving Outcomes for Black Male Students

Chris Chatmon, Executive Director of the Office of African-American Male Achievement in the Oakland Unified School District, discusses how his office has used a community-based approach to learn lessons, develop consensus and implement programs that produce positive outcomes for black males students.

 

How to Cut Suspensions in Half by Elia Bustamante of United for Success Academy

Elia Bustamante, Principal at United for Success Academy in the Oakland Unified School District, discusses the strategies her middle school community used to cut overall suspensions in half and lower suspensions of black male students by 72 percent.

 

Using Restorative Approaches to Discipline to Improve Outcomes for Black Male Students

Arnoldo Garcia, Restorative Justice Coordinator in OUSD, discusses the role a restorative approach to discipline, rather than a punitive one, can play in reducing adverse educational and social outcomes for black males.

 

Literacy as a Bridge to Improve Outcomes for Black Male Students

Sarah Breed, Manager of Literacy for the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD), discusses the role increased literacy can play in reducing adverse educational and social outcomes for black males.